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Zika Brain Defects May Show Up Months After Birth

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies exposed to the Zika virus in the womb can look normal at birth but later show signs of the devastating birth defect microcephaly and other brain abnormalities, researchers reported Tuesday.

Scientists found that 13 infants in Brazil who were exposed to the mosquito-borne virus during gestation had normal head size as newborns, but subsequently experienced slower head growth.

Eleven of these babies were diagnosed with microcephaly -- an abnormally small head and brain -- and other neurologic complications associated with Zika syndrome, the researchers reported.

"Among infants of mothers exposed to Zika virus during pregnancy, the absence of microcephaly at birth does not rule out congenital Zika virus infection or the presence of Zika-related brain abnormalities," according to a news release from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The findings from the U.S. and Brazilian research team underscore the need for continuing evaluation of newborns with possible Zika exposure during pregnancy, the CDC release said.

The findings also highlight the "importance of early neuroimaging for infants who were exposed to Zika virus prenatally," the agency added.

Although these babies all tested positive for Zika exposure in the womb, abnormal head growth wasn't detected until at least 5 months of age, according to the report.

The findings were published Nov. 22 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More details on how the Zika virus affects infants and adults will be presented to international researchers meeting in Chicago next week.

Most cases in the current crisis have occurred in Latin American countries. Three new studies from Brazil are scheduled for presentation at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

In one study, researchers used CT imaging to examine the central nervous system of 16 newborns whose mothers were infected with Zika during pregnancy. The babies were found to have a number of brain abnormalities.

"Our study proves that Zika virus infection can cause congenital brain damage in babies with and without microcephaly," study author Dr. Natacha Calheiros de Lima Petribu said in a society news release. She's with the department of radiology at Barao de Lucena Hospital in Recife, Brazil.

日期:2016年11月23日 - 来自[Health News]栏目
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Zika May Be Passed on Through Tears, Sweat: Report

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus might be able to pass from person to person through bodily fluids like tears or sweat, doctors reported Wednesday.

A 38-year-old man in Salt Lake City appears to have contracted Zika while caring for an elderly man who died from complications related to Zika infection, according to a report in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The younger man came into direct contact with the older man's tears and sweat while taking care of him, and that appears to be the way he contracted Zika, doctors at the University of Utah School of Medicine wrote in the journal.

Up to now, Zika virus mainly has been transmitted through mosquito bites, although in rarer instances it has been passed on through sexual contact.

The 73-year-old man had recently returned from a three-week trip to the southwest coast of Mexico, where he had been bitten by mosquitoes. Soon after returning to Utah, he reported Zika-like symptoms, including abdominal pain, sore throat, fever, red eyes and diarrhea. He eventually was hospitalized due to dangerously low blood pressure, labored breathing and an abnormally fast heart rate.

The man's condition declined while in the hospital, and he suffered respiratory and kidney failure. He died on day four of hospitalization, after care was withdrawn, the doctors wrote.

Five days after the older man died, the younger man reported having developed red eyes, fever, muscle pain and a facial rash. His urine and blood tested positive for Zika.

There has been no active mosquito transmission of Zika in Salt Lake City, the doctors reported, but the younger man had placed his hands on the older man while helping care for him.

The younger man had helped reposition the older man in his sick bed, and had wiped the man's eyes without using gloves, the doctors said.

The older man's death from Zika is rare. Up to now, only nine deaths directly caused by Zika infection have been confirmed in adults, the doctors noted in their letter.

日期:2016年9月30日 - 来自[Health News]栏目

CDC May Lift Zika Travel Warning for Part of Miami

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- America's top public health agency could lift its Zika virus travel advisory for the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami as early as Monday, officials said Thursday afternoon.

"Barring any new local transmissions in the affected area, we are expecting to be able to update guidance early next week," Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said during a media briefing.

Since early August, the CDC has urged pregnant women to avoid travel to the Wynwood neighborhood, based on evidence that mosquitoes had been actively transmitting Zika from person to person.

Zika is the first mosquito-borne virus known to cause terrible birth defects, most of them brain-related. The most common one is microcephaly, in which a child is born with an abnormally small brain and skull.

In other news, Congressional aides say Republicans are proposing to drop a restriction on Zika response money for Planned Parenthood that has held up release of at least $1.1 billion to fight the mosquito-borne disease, according to the Associated Press.

Democrats have opposed the funding restriction on Planned Parenthood, which would have kept Zika money in Puerto Rico from being distributed to some clinics associated with Planned Parenthood. Republicans were trying to circumvent Planned Parenthood because of its abortion services.

If a deal is reached, Zika response funding would be added to must-pass legislation intended to prevent a federal government shutdown this fall, the AP reported.

President Barack Obama in February asked Congress for $1.9 billion in emergency spending to fight Zika.

The Wynwood travel advisory constituted the first time the CDC ever warned people to avoid an American neighborhood due to an active infectious outbreak.

The potential lifting of the travel advisory came up during remarks by Owen Bale, director of the R House Restaurant in Wynwood, who discussed how being in the so-called "Zika zone" has harmed his business.

"We understand the travel advisory designation for Wynwood could be lifted this coming Monday, which is wonderful news," Bale said. "But business levels are returning to normal at an incredibly slow pace."

日期:2016年9月19日 - 来自[Health News]栏目
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Antibiotic Resistance May Threaten These Patients

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More people will die from common surgical procedures and cancer treatments if dangerous bacteria continue to develop resistance to widely used antibiotics, a new study warns.

Patients rely on antibiotics to protect them from potentially deadly infections after undergoing chemotherapy, pacemaker implantation, cesarean sections or countless other medical procedures, said study senior author Ramanan Laxminarayan. He is director of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy, a public health research organization in Washington, D.C.

The new study, published Oct. 15 in The Lancet, estimates that as many as half of infections after surgery and more than a quarter of infections after chemotherapy are caused by organisms already resistant to standard antibiotics.

If antibiotic resistance increases by just 30 percent in the United States, the tougher-to-treat bacteria could cause 6,300 more deaths a year and 120,000 more infections in patients undergoing either chemotherapy for cancer or 10 common surgical procedures, the researchers projected.

"Anytime you're going to need a surgery or a transplant, you're going to need effective antibiotics. It's something that affects all of us," Laxminarayan said.

Concern over antibiotic-resistant bacteria is growing. Earlier this year, the Obama administration released a national action plan to combat antibiotic resistance.

Also, the "superbug" MRSA was in the headlines this week after causing a serious infection in the ankle of New York Giants tight end Daniel Fells, prompting speculation the NFL player might need a foot amputation.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that at least 2 million people a year become infected by antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and at least 23,000 die from these infections.

But most of these worries focus on the ability to treat existing bacterial infections, and ignore the widespread use of antibiotics to prevent infections after surgery or chemotherapy, said Dr. Joshua Wolf, an assistant member of the infectious diseases department at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis.

"We know that kids with cancer have extremely high risk of bacterial infection that can be life-threatening. If resistance rates rise, those antibiotics will become less effective," said Wolf, who wrote an accompanying editorial in the journal. "Surgery will become less safe, and cancer treatment will become more difficult."

日期:2015年10月17日 - 来自[Health News]栏目

Added Calcium May Not Help Older Bones: Studies

By Alan Mozes

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extra calcium may not protect your aging bones after all.

New Zealand researchers who analyzed more than 100 previous investigations say guidelines advising seniors to consume at least 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams of calcium a day are misplaced.

No proof was found that boosting calcium intake beyond normal dietary levels strengthens older bones or prevents fractures, said researcher Dr. Mark Bolland.

"We've gathered all the clinical studies of calcium supplements and dietary calcium intake for both bone density and fractures," said Bolland, an associate professor in the department of medicine at the University of Auckland.

"Taken together, we think this is the strongest possible evidence that taking calcium supplements will not be beneficial unless there are clear medical reasons that a calcium supplement is needed," he said.

Moreover, excess calcium supplementation can be harmful, he and other experts said.

Bolland said the findings probably will surprise clinicians and patients, "because they have received very strong messages for many years about the importance of calcium for bone health in guidelines for osteoporosis management and by osteoporosis advocacy groups."

Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and porous with age, so that even mild stress can lead to fractures.

Bolland led one study review, and was a member of the second study review. The findings appear in the Sept. 30 issue of BMJ.

One review focused on two dietary studies that compared how patients over 50 years of age fared when instructed to consume higher versus lower levels of calcium. The research team also looked at 44 studies that explored how long-held calcium, milk, dairy and/or supplement routines affected fracture risk. Another 26 studies examining the impact of calcium supplements were also analyzed.

The conclusion: None of the research provided any evidence that calcium intake is associated with fracture risk.

The second review focused on 59 studies that looked at the effect of calcium from either food or supplements on bone mineral density in patients over 50.

In that study, boosting calcium intake in whatever form was associated with a small uptick in bone mineral density, but investigators concluded that the 1 to 2 percent increase detected had no meaningful impact on fracture risk.

日期:2015年10月1日 - 来自[Health News]栏目
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Older Adults‘ Hearing May Be Tied to Earlier Death

By Amy Norton

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with impaired hearing may have a shorter life span than their peers without hearing problems, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among nearly 1,700 U.S. adults aged 70 and up, those with hearing loss were 21 percent to 39 percent more likely to die over the next several years.

Experts stressed that the findings, published in the Sept. 24 online edition of JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, do not prove that hearing impairment, itself, shortens people's lives.

"This is an interesting observation, but it also needs to be taken with a grain of salt," said Dr. Ana Kim, director of otology research at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, in New York City, who was not involved in the research.

"There are so many variables that go into mortality," she said. "It would be too simplistic to say this is because of hearing impairment."

Lead researcher Kevin Contrera, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, agreed that the findings do not prove hearing loss is to blame.

But, he said, the study results call attention to the fact that hearing impairment is not just a normal part of aging.

"People tend to think, 'Oh, everybody loses their hearing as they get older,'" Contrera said. "But hearing loss has important effects on your life."

About one-third of U.S. adults aged 65 to 74 have at least mild hearing loss, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. That's true of almost half of people aged 75 and older.

For the new study, Contrera and his colleagues combed through data from an ongoing government health survey. The researchers focused on nearly 1,700 adults aged 70 and older who'd undergone hearing tests.

Overall, 589 study participants had mild hearing loss, while 550 had moderate to severe impairment. The rest -- 527 in all -- had normal hearing.

Older adults with hearing loss did tend to have other issues, as well -- including higher rates of smoking, heart disease and stroke. But even when the researchers factored that in, people with impaired hearing had a higher risk of dying over the next six years.

日期:2015年9月25日 - 来自[Health News]栏目

Breast-Feeding May Pass Common Chemical to Baby

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report.

The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains.

A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed.

This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent.

"This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's immune system is also stimulated by components of human milk," said Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "And now we're finding that there are contaminants in the milk that have the opposite effect of breast milk that are decreasing the impact of childhood immunizations."

PFASs can be found on waterproof or water-resistant clothing, and on furniture or carpeting treated for stain resistance, Grandjean said. The chemicals are also used in food packaging such as microwave popcorn bags and takeout pizza boxes.

"There's no way that young women can actively prevent their own exposures to these substances," he said.

An earlier study published by Grandjean showed that 7-year-olds with twice the blood concentration of PFASs had about half of the levels of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies as children with average PFAS levels.

"We found that for each doubling in exposure to PFAS, the child has an increased risk that the vaccination will not take," he said. "The risk increases between two- and fourfold for each doubling of the child's exposure."

As a next step in their research, Grandjean and his colleagues decided to look at whether breast-feeding might be a source of PFAS exposure for babies.

日期:2015年9月12日 - 来自[Parenting]栏目
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Too Little Sleep May Quadruple Your Risk for Colds

By Alan Mozes

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When you're run down from lack of sleep, you really are more apt to catch a cold, a new study finds.

Investigators exposed 164 adults to a cold virus, and found better-rested folks more likely to resist infection.

Those who slept fewer than six hours a night were more than four times as likely to catch a cold as those who got more than seven hours' shuteye.

"The role that sleep has on the immune system is well-established, though not completely understood," said study lead author Aric Prather, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco.

The study doesn't prove that insufficient sleep actually causes you to catch a cold. But it builds on prior investigations that have linked bad sleep habits to a weakened immune system and a potentially higher risk for developing an array of chronic illnesses.

Prather noted that animal and patient investigations have shown that "when an otherwise healthy person is (temporarily) deprived of an entire night of sleep, we see fairly robust changes in things like which types of immune cells are circulating in the blood and what types of chemical messengers are released from cells that aid in immune system communication."

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has expressed concern about an "epidemic" of insufficient sleep, the study authors noted. They also point to a recent National Sleep Foundation survey indicating that, on average, 20 percent of Americans get less than six hours of sleep a day.

Participants in this study were healthy Pittsburgh residents ages 18 to 55. All took part in a two-month health screening process between 2007 and 2011.

In the week leading up to their exposure to the cold virus, researchers monitored participants' usual sleep patterns. Afterward, all were quarantined in a hotel for five days and given nasal drops containing a cold virus.

The result: Cold risk was 4.2 times greater for those who slept fewer than six hours a night, and 4.5 times greater for anyone grabbing five hours or less of slumber a night, when compared with those getting more than seven hours a night.

日期:2015年9月1日 - 来自[Health News]栏目
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